Marriage Counseling.

Photo Courtesy: ©iStockphoto.com/dsteller

Marriage Counseling.  Not many couples participate in counseling because they don’t think it’ll work or they just don’t want to face and fix the problems.  Whatever the reason may be that you need or want marriage counseling, here is a great article written earlier this year by Michael Hyatt on what you should do to protect your marriage.

Although the post may get into religion, there are some great tips that you can still follow by – regardless of your religion.

As always, if you would like to seek marriage counseling here at Star Point Counseling Center of Brandon and Tampa, feel free to give us a call at (813) 244-1251 to see what’s right for you and your partner.

What are some tips that you follow by to keep your marriage healthy?  Share with us in the comments below!
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Tips for Parents

Hope everyone has been having a great weekend so far!

This is a post that we have already posted a few weeks ago, but we feel that these four tips by Co-Founder and Clinical Director of Star Point Counseling Center Clarissa Crystal-Belle are very important for parents who have children – whether they are in elementary, middle, high school, or even college.  It can be incredibly stressful for you to balance work life and family life, but we hope that you will keep these tips in mind always to help you avoid unnecessary stress.

 

Here they are:

1. Create and Maintain a Pleasant Home Atmosphere That is Conducive to Learning.

a) Keep your kitchen and common living areas tidy, calm and welcoming.

b) Establish doable routines and structure for self care, extracurricular activities, chores, homework, one on one and family time, and bedtime.

c) Provide healthy food choices avoiding stimulants such as fruit juice, carbonated drinks, caffeine, and sugar after 5PM.

d) Unplug all electronics at least until all of “b’ (except, of course, bedtime), has been accomplished.

e) Provide appropriate clothes that fit and meet school dress codes as well as adequate hygiene and self care products.

2. Communicate acceptance, approval, affection, support and encouragement.

a. Practice and use warm morning and afterschool greetings.

b. Express confidence in your child, preteen and teen.

c. Instill a can-do attitude by identifying his or her prior accomplishments, strengths, qualities, and attributes, daily.

d. Ask open ended questions to help identify, resolve, manage or eliminate specific stress factors he or she may be shouldering. Stress factors may overwhelm, embarrass, frustrate or even defeat your child, pertaining to challenges with academics, peers, or other personal factors you might otherwise not be privy to.

e. Be supportive and solution focused when addressing areas in which your child, preteen or teen is struggling to meet home, school or social expectations. Offering a tutor for a difficult subject, activities for social isolation or poor peer selection, a change in routine for insufficient sleep, etc., can make all the difference.

3. Keep yourself well.

a. Eat healthy and get plenty of exercise, relaxation, and sleep.

b. Keep yourself in good company when socializing.

c. Carve out some down time and alone time even if that means getting up a half hour earlier than the others in the home.

d. Choose your battles carefully.

e. Identify and utilize family, school and community resources as needed.

f. Have fun! Enjoy yourself and your family as much as possible.

4. Know when to seek professional help. Your children, preteens or teens may benefit from professional counseling services if presenting changes in behavior such as any one or more of the following:

a. An increase in negativity. A child, preteen or teen may benefit from professional services if he or she becomes defiant, non-compliant, argumentative, hostile, disorganized, or quick tempered, such as screaming, yelling and name calling.

b. A decrease in socialization. Seek help if he or she becomes more and more isolated, withdrawn, melancholy, bored and/or depressed. Seek immediate help if your child threatens or inflicts self harm or makes suicidal statements, threats or gestures.

c. A sudden and sustained change in mood, peer selection, activities, interests, behavior, sleep and/or eating patterns may indicate a need for counseling services.

d. A significant change in academic performance and/or school behavior, as evidenced by poor grades on assignments, quizzes, tests and projects, multiple zeros for failure to do or to turn in homework, a disorganized back pack, negative teacher reports and school referrals, may also suggest a need for counseling .

Which of these tips are most beneficial to you?  What are some other tips that you follow by that you can share with other parents?  Share with us in the comments below!

Have a great Sunday!

(Photo Credit:  http://pillsbury.mpls.k12.mn.us/parents)

Child Therapy

Hi everyone!

As we are a few weeks into the academic school year, we at Star Point Counseling Center hope that your children have transitioned from their summer playtime to school time.  If your children have not gotten used to the new school year or have certain problems in school/with classmates/teachers, we offer several counseling sessions that will benefit and help them.   Do not hesitate to call us at (813)244-1251 to see what types of counseling your child needs and to schedule an appointment with us.

We have two convenient locations in Brandon and Tampa for you to choose from, please visit Brandon’s website here and Tampa one here for more information.

How was your Labor Day?  Hope it was fantastic — share with us what you did in the comments below!

Have a wonderful week everyone!